State Programs > State Profiles
Hawaii

State Librarian

Mr. Richard Burns
State Librarian
Hawaii State Public Library System
44 Merchant Street
Honolulu, HI 96813-4311
Phone: 808/586-3704
Fax: 808/586-3715
E-mail: stlib@librarieshawaii.org

State library website:
http://www.librarieshawaii.org

photo of Hawaii State Librarian“The Hawaii State Public Library System’s vision is to be the educational, informational and cultural heart of our communities.  We will continue to maximize current and emerging technologies to provide all the people of Hawaii with the tools they need to access and search our collections, when they want, where they want and how they want.  Because in many communities our libraries are the only source of free internet access, we are increasing digital literacy and technology training for the public.”

--Richard Burns, State Librarian, Hawaii State Public Library System

Read the Hawaii State Public Library System Interview with IMLS.

 

The Grants to States Program

The Grants to States Program is the largest grant program run by IMLS; it provides funds to State Library Administrative Agencies (SLAAs) using a population-based formula set by the law. SLAAs determine goals and objectives for the funds in their statutorily required five-year plan (see below). For more information, see the Grants to States program overview.

 

Recent Allotments

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
$1,263,127 $1,199,217 $1,159,084 $1,177,141 $1,205,222


View allotments for all states
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Project Examples

Hawaii Connectivity and Access
This statewide project used grant funds to improve access to physical and virtual collections and services, and to ensure effective staff operations through best-practice technologies. Encompassing a range of enhancements, including wireless capability to all library sites, hardware and software upgrades for the integrated library system (ILS) and public access catalog, self-service and automated library service options, a laptop loan project, and access to e-resources through remote authentication, the project ultimately provided improved customer service. The Hawaii State Public Library System also developed an IT disaster prevention and response plan, used increasingly powerful statistical and reporting tools to understand patrons’ needs, and launched Facebook and Twitter accounts during the project period. Hawaii’s geographic configuration supports concentrating these funds on connectivity and technology, resulting in improvements that are widely distributed.
IMLS Funds: $657,327

Hawaii Virtual Library Collections
The realities of level or declining budgets, staff vacancies and turnover, and the high cost of supporting more than 50 physical facilities has led to the steady development of virtual library resources at the state level. These are intended to complement the strengths of traditional public library services and collections. The project anticipates changes in library services over time, including the move from physical to online collections, from library buildings to home and community access points, from staff-mediated services to self-service and personalized options, and from requiring patrons to come to the library to delivering collections and services to patrons. During the project period, grant funds supported costs for databases and online courses, available statewide. The Hawaii State Public Library System also reorganized the webpage portal to databases and other e-resources to facilitate access.
IMLS Funds: $501,757

Other project(s) featured through IMLS media include:

Search the Awarded Grants Database for additional details about awards in this state.

 

Five-Year Plan

Each state creates a 5-year plan for its programs to strengthen the efficiency, reach, and effectiveness of library services. Click here to read Hawaii's 5-year plan for 2013-2017 (PDF, 20,763KB). View all states' plans.

 

Five-Year Plan Highlights

Lifelong Learning

General Services and Initiatives

  • Explore avenues for collection building to meet the needs of underserved communities and diverse populations.
  • Increase collections of foreign language materials in libraries that demonstrate need.
  • Offer assistance to library users who want to learn how to access e-resources.

Literacy

  • Encourage adult, family, and early literacy initiatives, and engage partnerships in these efforts.

Information Access

General Services and Initiatives

  • Investigate appropriate options to deliver library services in underserved communities, including the possibility of purchasing and installing electronic modular access units.
  • Explore avenues for resource sharing to meet the needs of underserved communities and diverse populations.
  • Research feasibility and install, if appropriate, library materials vending machines in areas without a physical library building.

Access to E-Resources

  • Provide 24/7 virtual collections to all who have a public library card and Internet access, and provide access to online resources by developing and promoting an appropriate collection of online databases and other online resources to complement and supplement physical library collections, especially in our smaller libraries:
    • Continue to pay the annual subscription fees for current online databases and e-resources, including HI Tech Academy, while continuing to monitor usage and continuing the search for newer and better e-databases and other e-resources.
    • Continue to work with the Hawaii Library Consortium (HLC) to effect savings in online database subscriptions.
    • Continue to monitor developments in the e-book/e-audio/e-music markets and implement best practices.
    • Continue to purchase selected digital database collections to reduce annual subscription/access costs.
    • Explore and add enhanced student achievement support e-programs and services such as Tutor.com.
    • Research and establish, if appropriate, inter-library tutoring centers with telecommunications equipment for live participation.
  • Expand self-service, privacy-enhancing and personalized service options for patrons through promoting what is available and adding to collections and new services as appropriate. Some specifics:
    • Add download stations in libraries for patrons to use to download e-books/e-audio/e-music to their personal mobile devices.
    • Encourage increased patron use of self-checkout machines, where available in branch libraries, and increase the number of libraries with this hardware, with priority given to those with high circulation and staffing shortages.
    • Research feasibility of paying fines and fees online.
    • Develop procedures for patron borrowing of e-readers and laptops.
    • Research the feasibility of offering print-on-demand services.

Digitization/Preservation

  • Increase access to information by digitizing our state’s unique resources.
  • Purchase scanning equipment as financial resources allow.
  • Evaluate partnership options to maximize the use and benefits of sharing available resources for digitization projects.

Economic and Employment Development

Job Seekers

  • Meet Hawaii's patrons' needs for workforce development and 21st century skills by improving the technological infrastructure statewide to ensure access in public libraries and remotely to databases, job training and job search sites, and other e-information related to job seeking.

Institutional Capacity

Continuing Education

  • Continue to support initiatives, including client relationship methodology (CRM), to ensure that staff is well-equipped to meet patrons' needs in a wide range of technological skills and resources.
  • Train appropriate staff in the use of Portfolio to manage Hawaii’s digitized material.

Marketing and Market Research

  • Establish and evaluate pilot or demonstration projects.
  • Increase patron awareness and use of the foreign language desktop option on the Hawaii State Public Library Systems website.
  • Explore avenues for outreach to meet the needs of underserved communities and diverse populations.
  • Develop data analytics and utilization of dashboard components to enable the state library administration to elevate the qualitative and quantitative analysis of performance indicators.

Technology

  • Research feasibility and implement, if appropriate, a statewide database for fines/fees management and collection for all state agencies.
  • Research feasibility and establish, if appropriate, learning labs and/or media creation labs in libraries.
  • Implement a multi-pronged approach to improve the speed and quality of fulfilling patron requests for materials and education about available resources.
  • Optimize limited staff resources and provide improved public library services and collections in an efficient, effective, fiscally sound manner by implementing a staff intranet and other staff productivity tools, including SharePoint and annual subscriptions to databases and metadata services.

Civic Engagement

Civic Collaboration

  • Consolidate government/state initiatives by working cooperatively with all state departments and agencies, to improve government services to citizens and the ability to provide these services efficiently.

 

Five-Year Evaluation

At the end of a 5-year period, each state reports their results in achieving goals and objectives projected in their 5-Year Plan. Click here to read Hawaii's 5-year evaluation for 2008-2012 (PDF, 4,182KB). View all states' evaluations.

 

IMLS Data Collection

State Library Survey
The State Library Agency Survey (SLAA) provides descriptive data about state library agencies for all fifty states and the District of Columbia.

Public Library Survey
The Public Library Survey (PLS) provides national descriptive data on the status of public libraries in the United States and its territories. Data are collected from over 9,000 public library systems with over 17,000 public library outlets. Click here for Hawaii's profile from the most recent PLS publication (PDF, 373KB).